References

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[2] http://www.dmmclimbing.com/productsDetails.asp?id=1&id2=50 accessed 24 November 2007.

[3] Images from: http://www.dmmclimbing.com/products.asp?id=3&page=Products accessed 24 November 2007.

[4] Daniel Gay and Suong V Hoa, Composite Materials: Design and Application , CRC Press, 2006.

[5] Images from: Adrian Berry and John Arran, Trad CLIMBING + , Rockfax, 2007, Illustrations by Ray Eckermann.

[6] EN 12275, Mountaineering equipment - Connectors - Safety requirements and test methods, British Standards Institution, 1998.

[7] UIAA 121, Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment - Connectors, Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme, 2004.

[8] F. L. Matthews and R. D. Rawlings, Composite Materials: Engineering and Science , Chapman & Hall, 1994.

[9] George H. Staab and Amos Gilat, High Strain Rate Response of Angle-Ply Glass/Epoxy Laminates , Journal of Composite Materials, Vol. 29, No. 10, 1308-1320, 1995.

[10] Kevin Potter, An Introduction to Composite products: Design, Development and Manufacture , Chapman & Hall, 1997.

[11] The climbing rope is threaded through the belay device, which acts as a friction brake on the rope so that if the climber falls, his partner can halt the fall by locking off the device.

[12] A piton is a metal peg that is hammered into cracks in the rock to provide an anchor point for a climber.

[13] http://www.bdel.com/gear/hotwire.php accessed 4 June 2008.

[14] Images from: http://www.bdel.com/gear/biners_overview.php accessed 4 June 2008.

[15] http://www.needlesports.com/acatalog/Mail_Order_Karabiners_22.html accessed 4 June 2008.

[16] http://www.rockrun.com/ accessed 4 June 2008.

[17] http://www.ahsrescue.com/c-104-making-a-carabiner-by-dmm.aspx accessed on 4 June 2008.

[18] A common knot used in rock climbing.

[19] Tom Moyer, Drop tower - A simulation of climbing belays and rescues, 2006 International Technical Rescue Symposium. Available from: www.xmission.com/~tmoyer/testing/Simulation_of_Climbing_and_Rescue_Belays.pdf

[20] Material data sheet: Alloy 7075 plate and sheet, Alcoa Mill Products.

[21] Material data sheet: Aluminum 7075-T6; 7075-T651 from www.matweb.com accessed 4 June 2008.

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[25] CES Edupack 2007, Granta Design Limited.

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[27] Serge Abrate, Impact on composite structures , Cambridge University Press, 1998.

[28] Daniel Gay and Suong V Hoa, Composite Materials: Design and Application , CRC Press, 2006.

[29] Gao, S.-L. and J.-K. Kim, Cooling rate influences in carbon fibre/PEEK composites. Part III: impact damage performance. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 2001. 32 (6): p. 775-785.

[30] M. J. Murray, Fracture of WC-Co Alloys: An Example of Spatially Constrained Crack Tip Opening Displacement , Proc. RSL. Ser. A, Mat. Phy. Sci., Vol. 356, No. 1687. (Sep. 26, 1977), pp. 483-508.

[31] http://www.itftennis.com/technical/equipment/rackets/history.asp accessed on 44 June 2008

[32] Greenhalgh, E. and M. Hiley, The assessment of novel materials and processes for the impact tolerant design of stiffened composite aerospace structures. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 2003. 34 (2): p. 151-161.

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[44] Walker, L., Improving impact resistance of carbon-fibre composites through interlaminar reinforcement. p. 893-902.

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[46] Gao, S.L., Cooling rate influences in carbon fibre/PEEK composites. Part 1. Crystallinity and interface adhesion. p. 517-530.

[47] Gao, S.-L. and J.-K. Kim, Cooling rate influences in carbon fibre/PEEK composites. Part II: interlaminar fracture toughness. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 2001. 32 (6): p. 763-774.

[48] Gao, S.-L. and J.-K. Kim, Cooling rate influences in carbon fibre/PEEK composites. Part III: impact damage performance. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing, 2001. 32 (6): p. 775-785.

[49] Pegoretti, A., A. Zanolli, and C. Migliaresi, Flexural and interlaminar mechanical properties of unidirectional liquid crystalline single-polymer composites. Composites Science and Technology, 2006. 66 (13): p. 1953-1962.

[50] Tanoglu, M., et al., The effects of glass-fiber sizings on the strength and energy absorption of the fiber/matrix interphase under high loading rates. Composites Science and Technology, 2001. 61 (2): p. 205-220.

[51] Data from CES Edupack, name of database record: Cyanate ester/HM carbon fibre, UD composite, Quasi-isotropic Laminate.

[52] Tom Kelley, The art of Innovation , Profile Books, 2001.

[53] Image from: http://www.madehow.com/Volume-3/Tennis-Racket.html accessed 4 June 2008.

[54] CES Edupack 2007; name of database record: PEEK/IM carbon fibre UD composite, quasi-isotropic laminate.

[55] T. A Siewert et al, Performance Verification of Impact Machines

for Testing Plastics , J. Res. Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. 104, 557 (1999).

[56] CES Edupack 2007; name of database record: PEEK 30% carbon fibre.

[57] www.hilton-engineering.co.uk

[58] Information supplied by Black Diamond directly.

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